Blobfish, 2019

Silicone; digital print; L.S. Starrett combination square with center and protractor heads, double square, square attachments, diemaker’s square, key seat clamps, rule clamps, parallel clamps, steel clamp, combination hand vise, Vernier caliper, rule holder, and 6”, 12”, 18”-long blades; glass lacrymatory; pedestal.

115 x 100 x 70cm (blobfish)
890 x 965cm (floor print)
185 x 86 x 127cm (pedestal, stand, lacrymatory)

The namesake fish of this work is held together by the encompassing pressure of the deep sea. Out of its native environment, the blobfish’s soft bones and gelatinous flesh decompress, and deracinate. Like the subject of 'Forget Sorrow Grass,' its home both coheres it and serves as an existential limit. Its precarity evolves from protracted time in a singular habitat.

In this sprawling installation, visitors walk over a giant, distorted image of a baby, and encounter a silicone blobfish and a stand made with rulers with an imperial standard. The latter’s measurements come from a king’s body. Perched atop the stand is a lacrymatory, popular during the Victorian era and perhaps known to contemporary viewers through 'Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood' as a tear catcher. The mouth-blown glass vessel—a collaboration with Alex Rosenberg—recalls French curves, used to fit dresses to a woman's body. It is filled with tears.

Commissioned by the Guangdong Times Museum for the 2019 exhibition 'Forget Sorrow Grass: An Archaeology of Feminine Time,' curated by Jianru Wu and Sirui Zhang.
Blobfish, 2019
Blobfish, 2019
Blobfish, 2019
Blobfish, 2019
Blobfish, 2019